Tennessee Cattle

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The American consumer has demonstrated to us that the safety and quality of the food which they eat is one of their top priorities. As beef producers, it is our responsibility to insure that every animal which leaves our operations has been managed and treated correctly. This will insure that when the animal leaves the farm to go to the next link in the beef production chain it will be a fault free product to put the finishing touches on. If everyone does this, we are taking a huge step towards securing an even brighter future for our industry.

One of the primary goals of Tennessee's BQA program is to bring our BQA efforts to the same level of many other states' BQA programs. Why should we care about other states? It's pretty simple. The states that buy higher quality, source verified, Tennessee feeder cattle with a sound health program will be assured that these calves are ready to go. Many of the alliances and branded beef product lines are also demanding these calves. In short, the most progressive beef programs in the country are demanding high quality, properly managed cattle with sound vaccination program. Cattle that are source verified and their producers are BQA Certified will attract buyers because they help insure a higher quality final product...BEEF.

 

USDA Cattle Reports

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cattletoday.xml

IBBA ANNUAL MEETING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 10-11, 2017
The International Brangus Breeders Association's (IBBA) 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention is scheduled for February 10-11 in San Antonio, Texas.
DEBTER HEREFORD FARM HOLDS 44TH ANNUAL SALE
Debter Hereford Farm's 44th Annual Production Bull Sale was held, October 22nd, at the farm in Horton, Alabama.
TAKING A LOOK AT 2017 FOR CATTLE PRODUCERS
It's time to drag out the trusty crystal ball and take a look at what 2017 has in store for the beef cattle industry. For this to make sense we need to consider where we came from and how we got to where we are.
IT'S THE PITTS -- CATTLE TRAITING
Expected progeny differences (EPD's) have done wonders in improving the quality of our cattle. My only problem with EPD's is there aren't enough of them for traits that I'm most interested in.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- FEWER AND BIGGER
Whether the proverbial chicken or egg, another round of agricultural consolidation appears to be spurred along by suppliers dealing with narrow margins.
BLACK INK -- MAKING THE MOST OF IT
“Suppose we could only make 1 million cars. If the auto industry was limited for some reason, what would they do? Would they make small, cheap vehicles or big, premium, expensive cars?” An industry observer asked that question at a cattle feeders meeting this summer.
LATE WEANING HELPS AVOID EFFECTS OF HARSH WINTER
A growing number of stockmen are calving later in the year (April, May or June) rather than early, to be more in tune with nature. They have green grass at calving time and less need for harvested forage when the cow's nutritional needs are peaking during lactation.
NEW VETERINARY FEED DIRECTIVE TAKE EFFECT JANUARY 1, 2017
As of January 1, 2017, beef producers must comply with the new rule regarding use of antibiotics in feed. This rule is aimed at better management of certain antibiotics considered medically important to humans—putting them under more veterinary supervision. This is part of a larger movement to minimize development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

HEALTHY SOIL AIDS GRASS AND ANIMAL VIGOR
Dung beetles, earthworms and pollinators are the good guys when it comes to the health of soil and grassland resources.
RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW WHITE CLOVER
Researchers at The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and University of Georgia (UGA) have developed a new white clover variety called Renovation to help agricultural producers improve and maintain healthy, productive pastures.
IT'S THE PITTS -- WISE BEYOND HIS YEARS
My shrewd buddy Everett came by for a visit today. I haven't seen him for awhile because he's been hauling stock, driving his John Deere and learning how to operate a backhoe.
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- MOM'S CHRISTMAS MEMORIES
Christmas Eve was always celebrated at a little two-room country school called Bethel School House out in the middle of Greggs' pasture.
CALVING IS VERY IMPORTANT TIME IN PRODUCTION YEAR
For the cow-calf operation, the main goal is for each breeding female to produce a healthy calve once per year. That said, in the typical cow-calf operation, calving is, without a doubt one of the most important periods of the entire production year.
EPDS PROVIDE THE MOST ACCURATE SELECTION METHOD
Selecting beef cattle based on expected progeny difference (EPD) values provides the most accurate selection method currently available to beef producers for economically important traits.

WILL IONOPHORES BE AFFECTED BY REGULATION CHANGES?
An ionophore is a feed additive used in beef cattle rations to improve feed efficiency and animal gains.

These are a few of the topics being discussed on the Q&A Boards.
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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

black buzzards, any other ideas
by Margonme (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:25:25 GMT+5)
The population of the black vulture in comparison to the turkey vulture is increasing in Kentucky. If a deer is on the side of the road, there will be as many black as turkey on it.

I bring all my cows up to the headquarters for calving. I have a very narrow calving season so it is convenient. The producers here who do not manage their calving season have a much more difficult time doing that. As M-5 said, if they are on the back 30, better watch out. There are so many of them, it is impossible to control them. I am running all AI now, my calves are valuable, I cannot tolerate losing them to vultures. So I stay right on them when I calve.



My supplementary website
by lillypl1 (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:20:36 GMT+5)
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What are you eating today?
by skyhightree1 (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:14:02 GMT+5)
M-5 wrote:yall be sure to watch "my 600# life " I am sure sky will be on it soon.





Is it safe to drink milk from a Johnes cow?
by regolith (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:08:49 GMT+5)
Best to ship her. If she doesn't have clinical signs now it's likely she'll develop them in the future - next week or five years from now - and in the meantime could infect your pastures or other cattle.

As for drinking the milk from an individual known Johne's cow... personally, I wouldn't. But given that most dairy herds in this area, and probably in your area too, have some Johnes cows and the farmers and their families often drink the raw milk without any ill effects, I couldn't say it's not safe.



Incubating some eggs?
by M-5 (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:01:43 GMT+5)
Bigfoot wrote:Got 48 eggs in the incubator, so I guess in 21 days we'll know something.

I found my Book (so to speak) my wife reminded me I loaned the incubator to the lady at the feed store about 4 yrs ago , She has since closed down and I assume took the incubator and turner with her along with the leaflet . Oh well thought I could help.



Old Timer Made me Second Guess Myself
by BK9954 (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:50:59 GMT+5)
The history of this auction is it is almost been run into the ground after being one of the busiest. The auction on the Wednesday before that was taken over by a new owner has become one of the biggest in the area. Not by coincidence.



Black Bulls on Green Grass
by gizmom (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:32:01 GMT+5)
Going down the drive this morning I saw the bulls on the grass and just had to take a few photos. Took them with my phone so not the greatest photos but they sure look nice standing in some green. We had a late start with our winter pasture this year so they haven't been on it until last week. The boss is starting to turn them out in the morning on the grass then about mid day will pull them off and grain them.













Used Trucks
by True Grit Farms (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:18:15 GMT+5)
cfpinz wrote:True Grit Farms wrote:
This is the first truck that I've been able to adverage 20+mpg. It's a single wheel long bed crew cab 4x4 3500 with 3.42 gears. To get 20k lbs moving you start off easy then once you get to 10 mph it's race on, I'm very impressed to say the least. But my 2011 dually with 3.73 gears adverage 14 mpg and 17+ on the highway.
cfpinz you must have a 4.10 gears and a flat bed bed? I can relate to the 7 mpg pulling heavy. Towing 30k I get 8 mpg and 25k 9 mpg wind drag kills my fuel mileage.

Is yours an automatic or manual? Dad bought a '15 single cab long bed 3500 srw manual and it's got the 3.42's, I hate that thing. Seems like it'll run 70 in reverse.

Mine has the 3.73's, just about ideal for the engine but I wish the transmission had a little lower 1st and reverse was cut by at least half. And yes, it's a steel flatbed. If you let the rpm's get too low in 4th gear and mash it, it'll break the stock clutch loose. Pretty impressive engine, just wish they'd put it in a real truck.

Yes mines an 68rfe automatic transmission. My dually was a 6 speed manual and towed a load smoothly compared to the automatic. If Ram would make the 6 speed with a granny first and reverse they'd have something. Between my two Ram trucks since 2011 I've put 215,000 miles on them and never brought either one in for service or all the dang factory recall notices. The one I have now I replaced the water pump at 87,000 miles though.



3 week old calf drinking water
by TCRanch (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:15:27 GMT+5)
skyhightree1 wrote:dun wrote:monkey see monkey do. Her momma drinks water so she does too. Wait till she starts chewing her cud in a couple of days, that will really blow your mind

What blows my mind is how all calves come out as black belt ninjas and can kick you with the utmost speed and accuracy..

And how! I'm putting off a surgery until after calving because recovery is 6 weeks, no contact sports. And it's not the mamas I'm worried about



Interesting voting facts.
by greybeard (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:59:57 GMT+5)
I am pretty sure the Russians have influenced the CT photo contest poll a couple of times....



finishing steers
by Son of Butch (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:40:57 GMT+5)
Getting them sold is always the key. As long as you get them all sold at 2.50 lb hanging weight it's all good.
Best of Luck
And to the boards



Sweet Sixteen
by TexasBred (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:09:55 GMT+5)
First gun I ever bought was a Belgium made Sweet 16. Asked my boss what he would buy if he figured it would be the only shotgun he would ever own and that was what he recommended....gave $200 for it in 1971 tax included. Still looks almost new.



How to obtain a spotted calf
by Ohio Cowboy (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:07:41 GMT+5)
Supa Dexta wrote:farmerjan wrote:but reading it was making me go in circles....

Says the woman who writes novels as replies.

Lol



Green Bay at Dallas Cowboys 34-31
by TexasBred (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:07:11 GMT+5)
haase wrote:Boot Jack, you are right, it has more to do with pride and also tradition, with over 100,000 names on the waiting list, which they say is about 30 years to get season tickets, no other team can come close to that, also with one of the oldest stadiums in the NFL they didn't have to print a whole lot of money since 1957 to do some of the improvements that they have done since then, the only older stadium older is soldier field, but that has been totally renovated.
haase what would they do if they DID have to build a new stadium for whatever reason. Issue more stock?? Borrow from banks, etc......just curious.



What's something you've done, 99% of us haven't?
by TexasBred (Posted Wed, 18 Jan 2017 10:54:29 GMT+5)
greybeard wrote:TexasBred wrote:Been wondering if I had ever done anything somewhat different and happened to remember that I went to Cuba in 1984 to shoot a fishing show for TV. Guy over in East Texas had a TV show (John Fox, The American Angler) . I and an attorney friend went with him, Nolan Cromwell, Larry Brooks and Jack Youngblood who were all playing football with the L.A. Rams at the time and spent a week catching some awesome bass. Had to fly to Cancun from the U.S. then catch a private plane to Havana. Had to fish out of some pretty primitive boats but it was worth it.
I caught more fish in the back side of Guantanamo Bay where the river flows in than I ever will anywhere else in the world combined. It ruined me for fishing for about 4 years.
GB that's the way this was. They told us they didn't let the "natives" fish in them....you literally got exhausted taking fish off the line and everyone was wearing bandaids on their thumb from lipping those bass..We all shipped back one large fish for mounting (I'm talking 15 lbs. or more)........NONE made it back to the states for some reason.




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